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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

3 edition of Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings and their successors ... found in the catalog.

Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings and their successors ...

John Faithfull Fleet

Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings and their successors ...

by John Faithfull Fleet

  • 124 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Superintendent of Govt. Printing in Calcutta .
Written in English

    Places:
  • India
    • Subjects:
    • Inscriptions, Sanskrit,
    • India -- Antiquities,
    • India -- History -- Chronology,
    • India -- History -- Early

    • Edition Notes

      SeriesCorpus inscriptionum indicarum., v. 3, Corpus inscriptionum latinarum. Supplement ;, v. 3.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsCN1170 .C67 vol. 3
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvii, 194, 350 p.
      Number of Pages350
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6904418M
      LC Control Number01008182
      OCLC/WorldCa2554771

      Bhandarkar, Devadatta Ramakrishna: , Inscriptions of the Early Gupta Kings. (Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum vol. III [revised ed.]; edited by Bahadurchand Chhabra and Govind Swamirao Gai.) New Delhi: Archaeological Survey of India. Google ScholarCited by: 2. The Imperial Guptas and Their Times, (c. AD ), Munshiram Manoharlal, New Delhi, Singh, Upinder, A History of Ancient and Early Medieval India From the Stone Age to the 12 thFile Size: KB.

      Gupta, Chitrarekha, 'Rural-Urban Dichotomy' in the Concept and Status of Women: An Examination (from the Mauryas to the Guptas)' in K. Roy (ed.), Women in Early Indian Societies, Manohar Publishers, Delhi: For copper-plate inscriptions of contemporary India, see JOHN FAITHFUL FLEET, Inscriprions of the Early Gupta Kings and their Successors [Corpus lnscriprionurn Indicarum, Vol. ] (Varanasi: Indological Book House, [ Photo Reprint of the original edition published in ), "The Gupta Inscriptions," (herein-File Size: 1MB.

      Traikutakas will have very different dates if their inscriptions are keyed, as appears possible, to the Gupta rather than the Kalachuri-Ched; era. But of chronology more will follow. The inscriptions having been identified, we have spent much time in locating the sues. One must continue to regret the rather casual way in which the exact sites. Vishnusarma composed the Panchatantra stories during the Gupta period. Amarasimha was a Buddhist author who compiled a lexicon, Amarakosa. Science Developments in Gupta Period: Aryabhatta, the great mathematician and astronomer who wrote the book Aryabhatiya in A.D. The book explains the occurrence of solar and lunar eclipses scientifically.


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Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings and their successors .. by John Faithfull Fleet Download PDF EPUB FB2

Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings and their successors. Varanasi, Indological Book House, (OCoLC) Online version: Fleet, John Faithful, Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings and their successors.

Varanasi, Indological Book House, (OCoLC) Material Type: Biography: Document Type: Book: All Authors. ds: Kings Of Kanauj : Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Vol. 3 Ed. 3rd : Inscriptions Of The Early Gupta Kings And Their Successors : Print - Paper : Book : NE-DLI-TR Get this from a library.

Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings and their successors. [John Faithful Fleet]. Inscriptions of the Early Gupta Kings and Their Successors. Part I (Bibliography). [Ram Swaroop Mishra] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Gupta script (sometimes referred to as Gupta Brahmi Script or Late Brahmi Script) was used for writing Sanskrit and is associated with the Gupta Empire of India which was a period of material prosperity and great religious and scientific developments.

The Gupta script was descended from Brāhmī and gave rise to the Nāgarī, Śāradā and Siddhaṃ systems: Deodhai, Nāgarī, Śāradā. Toramana (Gupta script: Toramāṇa, ruled circa CE) was a ruler of the Alchon Huns who ruled its Indian region in the late 5th and the early 6th century.

Toramana consolidated the Hephthalite power in Punjab (present-day Pakistan and northwestern India), and conquered northern and central India including Eran in Madhya na used the title "Great Predecessor: Mehama.

Full text of "Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum Vol.3 (inscriptions Of The Early Gupta Kings)" See other formats. The early Gupta records do not mention of horsemen. The term pilapati occurs in a 6th century inscription from Bengal. The other military officers mentioned are mahabaladhikrita, mahapratihara and gaulmika.

The last two find mention in pre-Gupta inscriptions but the first appears as a new military functionary in this period. The Gupta Empire was an ancient Indian empire existing from the mid-to-late 3rd century CE to CE. At its zenith, from approximately to CE, it covered much of the Indian subcontinent.

This period is considered as the Golden Age of India by some historians. The ruling dynasty of the empire was founded by the king Sri Gupta; the most notable rulers of the Capital: Pataliputra.

Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum: Inscriptions of the Early Gupta Kings. revised. Vol. 3 Vol. 3 Archaeological survey of India, - Inscriptions - pages.

Śrīrāma Goyala, 3 books Tej Ram Sharma, 1 book Kōṭa Veṅkaṭācalaṃ, 1 book National Museum of India., 1 book Mamatā Miśrā, 1 book Paramānanda Miśrā, 1 book Baij Nath Puri, 1 book LeeAnn Blankenship, 1 book Śailendranātha Sāmanta, 1 book Vipulā Dube, 1 book Shivenandan Misra, 1 book Bardwell L.

Smith, 1 book Bharatarāma. Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum. Inscriptions of the Early Gupta Kings and their Successors Document Type Book Language English Publisher Name Superintendent Government Printing Publisher Region Calcutta, India Publication Date Subject History.

BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. PRIMARY SOURCES lao Inscriptions A. Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum (CID Series Bhandarkar, D.R., Chhabra, B.C. and Gai, G.S., Inscriptions o/the Early. in the Gupta inscriptions, 7 the status remained unchanged in the second generation, and from the third generation the Gupta kings became lly, Maharaja means a great king.

But the apparent and deliberate differentiation in the status of the earlier and later kings suggests that the political status of this Gupta was not much high in his own times. 8 Probably. Author of The Indian Antiquary, Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings and their successors, The Dynasties of the Kanarese Districts of the Bombay Presidency, Indian epigraphy, The Dynasties of the Kanarese Districts of the Bombay Presidency, Pali, Sanskrit, and old Canarese inscriptions, Translations of inscriptions from Belgaum and Kaladgi districts in the.

After centuries of political disintegration an empire came to be established in A.D. under the Guptas. Although the Gupta Empire was not as large as the Maurya Empire, it kept north India politi­cally united for more than a century, from A.

to The ancestry and early history of the Gupta family are little known, and have. 22 Allan, op. cit., p. liv. Admittedly, Allan's argument was that the coin was later than Ghaṭotkacagupta “could possibly be”.This is an indication of Allan's view of the fact that the coin was probably issued late in the numismatic sequence.

Now that we know that Ghaṭotkacagupta was about the same age as Skandagupta, we need to revise our estimate of Author: Pankaj Tandon. Gupta (gŏŏp´tə), Indian dynasty, AD c–c, whose empire at its height encompassed much of N t Indian culture reached a high point during this period.

Gupta paintings adorned the caves of Ajanta, its sculpture embellished the temples of Ellora, and its metaphysical speculations flowered in philosophy and in the study of mathematics.

The present work describes the material and moral progress which India had achieved during the paramount sovereignty of the Gupta emperors in the fourth and fifth centuries a.d. It traces the origin and rise of the ruling family to Srigupta ( a.d.) and concludes with the reign of Kumaragupta III ( a.d.).

It discusses the spirit of the age and the various trends in the. The work of destruction of the successors of Chandragupta II was effected by hordes of nomads from central Asia who swarmed across the north-western passes, as did the Sakas. Their first attack on the Gupta empire was in about A.D.

but was repulsed. Fleet, J.F., Inscriptions of the Early Gupta Kings and Their Successors, Corpus. Deogarh Dashavatara Temple (henceforth DATmpl), in Lalitpur (District), Uttar Pradesh (State), dated to last decade of 5th century A.D, commissioned by Budhagupta (c.

A.D),[1] is valuable to Indian Civilization and Bharatiya Tradition in many ways. In terms of Archeological finds (to date) and History, it is the ancient-most surviving temple that first featured prominent .The origin of the Guptas is somewhat obscure. Many authorities on Gupta history believe that they came from Magadha or northern Bengal, which was the original nucleus of their empire.

On the basis of the provenance of early Gupta coin hoards and the distri-bution of the important Gupta inscriptions, historians have now come to accept the lowerFile Size: 2MB.Inscriptions of the early Gupta kings and their successors: supplement to Fleet's Corpus inscriptionum Indicarum, 1st ed Varanasi: Banaras Hindu University, Banaras Hindu University.

Dept. of Ancient Indian History, Culture and Archaeology. Monographs ; 6 Corpus inscriptionum Indicarum, v. 3.